7th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention (IAS 2013)


MOAC01 Recent Advances in HIV Prevention for Men Who Have Sex with Men
  Oral Abstract Session : Track C Prevention Science
Venue: Session Room 1
Time: 01.07.2013, 11:00 - 12:30
Co-Chairs: Carlos F. Caceres, Peru
Iskandar Azwa, Malaysia

11:00
MOAC0101
Abstract
Differing identities, but comparable risks and HIV/STI burden, in married and unmarried men who have sex with men (MSM) in Mumbai
K.H. Mayer1,2,3, R. Gangakhedkar4, M. Mimiaga5,6,7, M. Sivasubramian8, K. Biello1,6, N. Abuelezam6, S. Mane8, V. Anand8, S. Safren1,2,7
1Fenway Health, The Fenway Institute, Boston, United States, 2Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States, 3Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Medicine, Boston, United States, 4National AIDS Research Institute, Pune, India, 5The Fenway institute//Harvard Medical School, Infectious Diseases, Boston, United States, 6Harvard School of Public Health, Epidemiology, Boston, United States, 7Massachusetts General Hospital, Psychiatry, Boston, United States, 8The Humsafar Trust, Mumbai, United States

11:15
MOAC0102
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Recent experience of intimate partner violence reduces self-reported condom negotiation efficacy among gay and bisexual men
C. Finneran, R. Stephenson
Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Hubert Department of Global Health, Atlanta, United States

11:30
MOAC0103
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Factors associated with acute HIV infection diagnosis in MSM, ANRS-Opportunity study
K. Champenois1, S. Le Vu2, L. Cuzin3, C. Semaille2, Y. Yazdanpanah1,4,5
1Inserm U738, ATIP/AVENIR, Paris, France, 2Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Saint-Maurice, France, 3CHU de Toulouse, Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Toulouse, France, 4Hôpital Bichat-Claude Bernard, Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Paris, France, 5Université Denis Diderot, Paris, France

11:45
MOAC0104
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
Being unaware of being HIV-infected is associated with alcohol use disorders and high-risk sexual behaviours among men who have sex with men in Peru
P. Vagenas1, K. Ludford1, P. Gonzales2, J. Peinado2, C. Cabezas3, F. Gonzales4, J. Lama2, J. Sanchez2, F. Altice1
1Yale University, AIDS Program, New Haven, United States, 2Associacion Civil Impacta Salud y Educacion, Lima, Peru, 3Instituto Nacional de Salud, Lima, Peru, 4Ministerio de Salud del Peru, Lima, Peru

12:00
MOAC0105
Abstract
Powerpoint
Webcast
The feasibility of implementing and evaluating combination HIV prevention interventions for high-risk populations in stigmatized settings: the case of men who have sex with men in Malawi
S. Baral1, A. Wirtz1, V. Jumbe2, S. Ketende1, D. Kamba3, C. Beyrer1, E. Umar2, S. Stromdahl1, G. Trapence3
1Center for Public Health and Human Rights, JHSPH, Epidemiology, Baltimore, United States, 2Malawi College of Medicine, Blantyre, Malawi, 3Center for Development of People, Lilongwe, Malawi

12:15
MOAC0106
Webcast
Moderated discussion

Powerpoints presentations
Recent experience of intimate partner violence reduces self-reported condom negotiation efficacy among gay and bisexual men - Catherine Finneran

Factors associated with acute HIV infection diagnosis in men who have sex with men, ANRS-Opportunity study - Karen Champenois

Being unaware of being HIV-infected is associated with alcohol use disorders and high risk sexual behaviours among men who have sex with men in Peru - Panagiotis Vagenas

The feasibility of implementing and evaluating combination HIV prevention interventions for high risk populations in stigmatized settings: the case of men who have sex with men in Malawi - Stefan Baral



Rapporteur report

Track C report by Ann Green


The session covered a range of risk factors related with transmission of HIV among men who have sex with men.

1. K.H. Mayer reported on sexual mixing patterns of Indian men whom have sex with men (MSM), revealing that HIV and STI prevalence was high among all MSM in Mumbai, and this, along with frequency of unprotected sex, did not differ significantly between married MSM (mMSM) and unmarried MSM (uMSM). A key difference lies in different personal identities, which suggests a need for prevention strategies tailored toward these sub-cultures.

Discussion points:

  • More research is needed to determine level of community awareness and risk of female partners.
  • Organizations involved in the study are currently trying to find tools to help men navigate partner discussions.

2. C. Finneran reported recent experience of different forms of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) was associated with reduced self-reported condom negotiation efficacy of gay and bisexual men (GBM), which may be a pathway to increase risk of acquiring HIV. Gay, bisexual, and other men whom have sex with men (MSM) should be screened for IPV during routine HIV counseling and testing, and tools to increase condom negotiation skills are needed.

Discussion points:

  • The included definitions of violence may be too broad.
  • Risk related to recipient vs. insertive role should be considered in future studies.

3. K. Champenois reported factors associated with acute HIV infection (AHI) diagnosis in MSM, important for early treatment initiation. Findings showed MSM diagnosed at AHI were more likely to have a recent history of HIV testing, and the test revealing HIV infection was more likely initiated by physicians, suggesting care providers need to remain alert about acute phase signs to detect HIV infected MSM early.

Discussion points:

  • Self-testing for HIV may help improve repeat testing.
  • Being an open MSM was related to having more and recent HIV testing.

4. P. Vagenas reported that 89.8% of 5,148 MSM in Peru were unaware of their HIV status. Unprotected anal intercourse at last encounter and alcohol use disorder were independent associated factors with newly diagnosed HIV infection. Unknown HIV status and alcohol use disorders should be considered in therapy interventions.

Discussion points:

  • Alcohol Use Disorders are complex to define in such studies. The AUDIT scale is a known approach for measuring levels of dependency, but it is not ideal.
  • Transgender women were enrolled in the study; results did not find this to be a significant factor.

5. S. Baral reported increased utilization of HIV services and high intervention retention rate among MSM in Malawi, which demonstrates the feasibility for implementing and evaluating community based HIV prevention strategies.

Discussion points:

  • RDS is a limited, often biased, approach but is considered the best feasible option in certain circumstances.
  • A 2-step screening method was used to weed out non-MSM participants attempting to take advantage of incentives.
  • The peer educator strategy employed may not be feasible in resource-limited settings.
A salient comment about the whole session was that the presentations were largely descriptive and the audience members longed for interventions, to which Dr. Mayer responded that this work was the backbone of future interventions. 

 




   

    The organizers reserve the right to amend the programme.